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Current students must register through the Recorder’s Office, which also oversees student files and posts grades.

Office: 022B
E-mail: lawosa@indiana.edu

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Alexis D. Lanham

Associate Director of Student Affairs
Phone: (812) 855-1888
E-mail: adlanham [at] indiana [dot] edu

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Indiana Law students can build their own plan of study by taking classes from a number of different areas, or they can choose an area of focus.

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B769 Banking Law

Description Banks are given specific and special powers in light of their roles assisting governments, entities, individuals and communities, and enjoy specific benefits such as access to deposits that the FDIC or credit union insurance funds insure. The availability of deposit insurance also empowers regulators to control risks that banks may take with insured deposits and has generated many of the limitations on bank powers of the past and today. This course surveys a wide range of laws applicable to corporations chartered specifically as banks by federal or state agencies, and, to a much lesser extent, to those operating as chartered savings and loan associations or thrifts, and credit unions. It covers chartering, branching, powers, preemption, antitrust considerations specific to acquisitions by banks and bank holding companies, and limitations on the types of entities that banks may own and invest in or that bank and thrift holding companies may own or invest in. The course introduces basics of administrative law. The course covers #hot topics# # economic sanctions against the Ukraine, and the nascent regulation of math-based #currencies# as well as the basics mentioned above. It will introduce some anti-money laundering principles and financial privacy. This course is fun partly because it is so different from other courses, and with any luck, it will be populated by a healthy mix of students from the US and from the grad programs, and even a joint law-Kelley or law-SPEA student to bring a moderately different perspective to classroom discussion. The final examination will be an in-class exercise with two or three questions containing a mix of law and policy issues. Students who have taken this class have tended to do well.

Faculty S. Hughes

SemesterTitleFaculty
Spring 2014 - 2015Banking LawHughes
Spring 2013 - 2014Banking LawHughes
Spring 2012 - 2013Banking LawHughes
Spring 2010 - 2011Banking LawHughes
Spring 2009 - 2010Banking Law (syllabus)Hughes